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New Interview by Zimbio

Recently, Rose McIver has been interviewed by Zimbio.

Throughout her career, Rose McIver has played a tightrope walker in a traveling circus, a headstrong fairy, a lustful debutante, and a Power Ranger. Clearly, the New Zealand-native is in no danger of being typecast.

In her newest role as a brain-eating zombie medical student in The CW’s upcoming crime drama iZombie (based on Chris Roberson’s DC Comics series of the same name), McIver once again proves her versatility. “I feel so incredibly lucky,” she told us. “Playing such different characters is my favorite thing about what I’ve done so far.”

Though most people recognize McIver from the 2009 Mark Wahlberg-starring supernatural drama The Lovely Bones (and later as Tinker Bell on Once Upon a Time and Vivian Scully on Showtime’s Masters of Sex), the actress has been in the game for more years than people realize.

By the age of two, McIver was already starring in a variety of New Zealand commercials, TV shows, and films. At three, she snagged a role in the 1993 Oscar-winning drama The Piano. Now 25, the Los Angeles-based Kiwi is set on boosting her already lengthy resume on this side of the world — and proving she’s definitely one to keep your eye on.

Zimbio: Congratulations on iZombie. Tell us about your character. 

Rose McIver: My name is Liv Moore. I’m a reluctant zombie who eats brains in order to survive and discovers that when she does, she has visions. She’s able to solve crimes because of it and work with homicide detectives to identify murderers.

That’s a very crazy concept. 

Yeah, a zombie procedural [laughs]. What’s interesting is that Liv tries to hide her zombie-ism the most. [The show] is more a study of someone who was a medical student and suddenly has to take a job at a morgue to facilitate her new diet. It’s definitely not zombies like we’ve seen them before.

How did you get into acting?

There was a role in a short film where my brother needed a younger sister. So at 18-months-old, I was in this short film. It did start early, but I never really considered myself a child actor. It was something I did for pleasure on the weekends or on holidays. When I turned 16, I started working as a lead on a show called Maddigan’s Quest, a sort of a circus troupe series. It was such a dream.

So you must have had a lot of gymnastics training growing up? 

I’ve always been active. I picked up dance, ballet, and ice skating. I definitely have a coordinated background.

Your breakout role was in The Lovely Bones. Did things change after that? 

After The Lovely Bones, I went back to New Zealand and straight to studying anthropology at university. A lot of people thought that I should have moved to the states. I’ve been so fortunate that I keep getting work, but I also think it’s important to have experiences to relay on screen. Finishing high school, going to university, traveling through Europe with friends — things like that have been really important to me. Hopefully, they will serve me in my career.

Do you feel like Hollywood makes it hard to focus on your personal life? 

There’s this New Zealand documentary called This Way of Life about a family who raises 10 kids off the land. There is one quote I really like. Somebody asks the father what he does for a living, and he says: “What do you mean? I live for a living.” I really like that. In order to sustain interest and passion, I need to maintain a balance.

What is your experience like interacting with your fanbases?

It can be quite hilarious. On Twitter, my Once Upon a Time fans and Masters of Sex fans — they don’t necessarily like both shows, so that’s interesting. The fanbase for Once Upon a Time is incredible. They’re so passionate and supportive. They really embraced me as Tinker Bell. Luckily, I’m not playing a villain, so I’ve had a lot of nice feedback [laughs].

What character do you relate to most on Once Upon a Time?

Emma. I’m intrigued by her character. She’s so tenacious and strong and a real warrior. Maybe it’s more “aspire to” than “relate to.”

Do you “ship” anyone on the show?  

No solid faves. But I’m so behind on the times. When I joined the show, people had to explain to me what “shipping” was. I love how people have so many different ideas about where they want the characters’ relationships to go. It gives the creators a lot of room to explore.

A live-action movie based on the Power Rangers is in the works. How do you feel about that? 

Whoever is going to be cast in that will have a great time. I worked on Power Rangers RPM for about nine months. I had a really, really good time working on it with a lot of my dearest friends. I remember the days of driving and tearing down these sand dunes with a stunt driver. I’m like, “What world do I live in where I can do this?”

Does Hollywood fame scare you? 

Until I’m actually in an experience I find uncomfortable, I don’t really live in fear. It’s a nice reminder to stay present. If anything, I think my fear is becoming somebody who lives in anticipation and retrospect. I want to really make sure I’m enjoying every day. I have good people in my life to make sure that happens.

You’re originally from New Zealand. Right now there are a lot of really great musical acts coming out of there. 

We have Lorde, The Naked and Famous. Yeah, there’s a bunch. We’re the little island that could, right?

Lorde is huge right now. Do you know her personally? 

We don’t actually know each other, but I know a lot of her very good friends and her producer Joel Little. The satellite community we have in the states is actually growing. It’s so funny, I can meet someone in L.A. and they ask me, “You probably might not know him, but do you know my friend, Dave?” I’ll say, “Well, I’m actually holding this coffee for him right now.” In the entertainment industry, everybody has worked with everybody, and everybody knows everybody.

Source : zimbio.com

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